Andre Durand

Discovering life, one mistake at a time.
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Archive for March, 2002

Blogging Innocence comes to an end…

March 30, 2002 By: Andre Category: Life


Well, I guess I’m going to have to pay more attention to what I say in my weblogs. Funny thing is, I’m not exactly sure if I’m happy or sad about it. Until I discovered blogging, I actually had no idea how enjoyable I found the act of writing, and while I can’t exactly call myself a regular, I do now consider it an important part of my life and I derive a great deal of enjoyment from having it as a creative outlet for my ideas.


But, I guess as is the case with everything, my weblogging days were bound to grow up eventually. Just this morning, a friend forwarded me a blog review of my most recent blog. As it turns out, Dave Winer, an individual with whom I hold a great deal of respect for, had some particular harsh words surrounding my ‘open source’ ideals as being basically outdated. Funny thing is, I can’t remember ever actually having an in-depth conversation with Dave about my ideas surrounding open source, and so it had to have been my poorly written weblog which created the confusion in the first place.


Oh well, I guess if I didn’t want anyone reading my stuff, I would write it in a journal and put it under my bed.

Time – Friend or Foe?

March 30, 2002 By: Andre Category: Life

As anyone in the software industry will tell you, time is rarely your ally. Well, while conventional wisdom tells us that anyone in the software technology business is in a race against the clock, I’ve discovered that this is simply not the case. Well positioned open source projects competing for market-share in spaces dominated by closed systems have the upper hand. Find out why…

Time – An Ally to Open Source

March 30, 2002 By: Andre Category: Musings

If you have linked here from Dave Winer’s weblog, make sure to also read “Wake up and Smell the Success” on my frontpage.


Many open source advocates write about the value of open source as being tied to free development, accessibility etc. etc. (www.opensource.org). While I am probably more skeptical than the pure open source advocates, my experience with Jabber has shown me one attribute of open source which I feel has been largely overlooked.


While it is probably not the open source communities role to speak to some of the additional marketing benefits of open source in a competitive environment, I have, in the past two years, through experience gained at Jabber, discovered perhaps one of the most important attributes of open source. 


It’s fairly well known that if you’re in the software industry, time is not your ally. Any traditional software company that has not viewed time as working against them has probably had their lunch handed to them in fairly short order. Smart software companies have learned to obsolete their own products before their competition did it for them, and the entire urgency surrounding feature deadlines are largely driven by a race to beat the clock.


The truth is, for many proprietary software companies, time does indeed tend to erode, almost exponentially, the return one might expect to see from their software assets.


But that’s not the case with open source, especially in markets where the open source project competes with proprietary and closed systems.


True unteathered accessibility and frictionless access to software and source code through the Internet can work for the open source initiative when competing against proprietary and closed software. In this particular case, time can and does in fact become an asset and ally in a well positioned and well executed open source project that seeks to gain marketshare while competing against well funded commercial competitors.

Open Identity Foundation

March 28, 2002 By: Andre Category: Life

While at PC Forum this last week I got together with three other ‘identity’ guys and we agreed to start a new entity called the Open Identity Foundation or OIDF. Esther Dyson joined us in the photograph as we completed our meeting.


Last Line of Defense

March 24, 2002 By: Andre Category: Life

There’s a well known mantra in the security industry that speaks to well designed security systems as adopting a separation of identity authentication into 1) something you have (e.g. ID card), 2) something you know (e.g. password, and 3) something you are (e.g. biometrics such as fingerprints etc.). While careful use of these techniques will serve to reduce the risk of identity theft, they will not eliminate it, and as people and systems come to rely more heavily on identity related conveniences, the potential damage from identity theft becomes that much greater. Read More…

Last Line of Defence: Relying on What’s Out of Any Individuals Control

March 24, 2002 By: Andre Category: Musings

There’s a well known mantra in the security industry that speaks to well designed security systems as adopting a separation of identity authentication into 1) something you have (e.g. ID card), 2) something you know (e.g. password, and 3) something you are (e.g. biometrics such as fingerprints etc.). While careful use of these techniques will serve to reduce the risk of identity theft, they will not eliminate it, and as people and systems come to rely more heavily on identity related conveniences, the potential damage from identity theft becomes that much greater.


But in and of itself, can identity theft really harm someone? It’s not like stealing a car, wherein the stolen item has utility in and of itself. Your digital identity is information, and that information can only bring harm to you or your digital reputation it is used by others in an unauthorized manner, and therein lies the foundation for what should be considered ‘the last line of defense – the identity infrastructure itself.’


Assume if you will that identity theft is innevitable. Identity infrastructure, which is out of any individuals control, should be designed to reduce the harm associated with that theft. In doing so, what is out of anyones individual control acts as an intrinsic safeguard to the unauthorized use of an identity, providing infrastructural-level mechanisms whereby the true identity holder is notified when a possible breach of security has occurred.


 


 

Digital ID World Launches

March 21, 2002 By: Andre Category: Life

Digital ID World, an industry portal and conference company launched its site today.

End-Game

March 21, 2002 By: Andre Category: Life

Identity is not an attribute of credit cards. Credit cards are an attribute of Identity.

The Conference

March 21, 2002 By: Andre Category: Ping Identity

Well, I know I’ve been pretty quiet for several months now, but you can usually tell how busy someone is by the ebb and tide of their blogging activity, unless of course you’re ERROR (doc searls), in which case, the busier you are, the more you blog! 🙂


The bulk of my attention has been on the Digital ID World conference coming up in October. There are 37 days left until D-Day and things are coming along nicely. We’ve got an all-star line-up of speakers and at the very least, I believe we’ll have cemented the conference as ‘the’ identity event to attend. 


On a more personal note, Parker Madison Durand is growing by leaps and bounds. Kim can’t wait to get to get to January so that she can once again fit into some regular-sized clothes. At this stage, I’m not sure I understand how some families have 4, 5 or 6 children! But we’re grateful to be healthy and things are going great.


I had an interesting individual respond a few days ago to the global consciousness 1.0 article I wrote about a year ago. He’s writing a book called ERROR (information god). I’m not sure that I agree with all of his statements, but it is an interesting perspective that attempts to explain why America is so prosperous.

Not all Identities were Created Equal

March 16, 2002 By: Andre Category: Ping Identity

There’s a big difference between an issued identity and an identity for which an individual has assumed true and unconditional ownership and accountability. This article examines the concept that there are in fact at least two distinct kinds of identity, for simplicity sake, referred to as Tier 1 and Tier 2. Tier 1 Identity shares many of the same attributes as its Tier 2 counterpart, however, from the perspective of the identity holder, is only contextual and temporal in nature, and therefore does not share the same weight or gravity as a Tier 2 Identity.